27th Jun 2014

#SAVEOAKFLAT video

honorthepeople.org

25th Jun 2014
lastrealindians:

Fighting with Spirit: How Greasy Grass was Won, By Ruth Hopkins
In ceremony, Sitting Bull gave 100 pieces of flesh. He went without water for two days and two nights. At Deer Medicine rocks, Sitting Bull was given a vision. During his life, Sitting Bull had several visions that came true. Yes, Tatanka Iyotanka (Sitting Bull) was a Chief, a statesman, and an exemplary warrior who was a sash wearer and member of the Kit Fox Society and the Midnight Strongheart Society, but he was also a respected holyman. He was a prophet.
In his vision, Sitting Bull saw soldiers riding on horseback, falling asunder into his camp. Their hats fell off. They fell like grasshoppers, he said. It was then that a voice told him: “I give these to you because they have no ears.” To Sitting Bull and other Lakota this vision meant they would have a great victory over the bluecoats. Sitting Bull’s vision occurred just two weeks before the Battle at Greasy Grass.
During the Battle of Greasy Grass, Sitting Bull did not fight because he was older. Instead, he gave his strong medicine to his nephews White Bull and One Bull, who did.
When Custer attacked, some warriors were just getting out of Inipi. They grabbed their weapons and started fighting right out of the sweat lodge. Was this because Custer caught the Lakota sleeping? No. The Lakota knew the 7th Cavalry was coming. Those men were in Inipi because ceremony and prayer are central to living Wolakota. We don’t compartmentalize our spiritual beliefs and keep them separate from the rest of who we are. This isn’t Sunday church service. Ceremony is life. We are to live our sacred ways every day the best we can.
We are a prayerful people, a soulful people. Spirituality is key to our identity as Oceti Sakowin, and the same can be said for many Natives who practice their traditional ways. We are spirits inhabiting bodies and there’s no defeating the spirit of a Native who is the living embodiment of his or her ancestors. This is something the Western Empire never fully understood, although they realized it was powerful. That’s why the government outlawed our sacred ceremonies for decades. We should all be thankful to those who kept them safe so we could pass them onto future generations.
Each of us is fighting a difficult battle- be it personal one, or for your family or community. Some fight addiction or trauma, others fight poverty, oppression, environmental destruction, or societal ignorance. Some of us are simply born to rage. Yet no matter your battle remember this: do as your ancestors did and consult the spirits. Let them help. Sitting Bull did. Purify yourself with sage and cedar. Pray. Sometimes that’s all you have, but it may be all you need. Arm yourself with the pipe, the canupa. This is the missing piece of our current puzzle, folks. Returning to the ways will bring healing and mend the sacred hoop.
READ THE REST HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/fighting-with-spirit-how-greasy-grass-was-won-by-ruth-hopkins/

lastrealindians:

Fighting with Spirit: How Greasy Grass was Won, By Ruth Hopkins

In ceremony, Sitting Bull gave 100 pieces of flesh. He went without water for two days and two nights. At Deer Medicine rocks, Sitting Bull was given a vision. During his life, Sitting Bull had several visions that came true. Yes, Tatanka Iyotanka (Sitting Bull) was a Chief, a statesman, and an exemplary warrior who was a sash wearer and member of the Kit Fox Society and the Midnight Strongheart Society, but he was also a respected holyman. He was a prophet.

In his vision, Sitting Bull saw soldiers riding on horseback, falling asunder into his camp. Their hats fell off. They fell like grasshoppers, he said. It was then that a voice told him: “I give these to you because they have no ears.” To Sitting Bull and other Lakota this vision meant they would have a great victory over the bluecoats. Sitting Bull’s vision occurred just two weeks before the Battle at Greasy Grass.

During the Battle of Greasy Grass, Sitting Bull did not fight because he was older. Instead, he gave his strong medicine to his nephews White Bull and One Bull, who did.

When Custer attacked, some warriors were just getting out of Inipi. They grabbed their weapons and started fighting right out of the sweat lodge. Was this because Custer caught the Lakota sleeping? No. The Lakota knew the 7th Cavalry was coming. Those men were in Inipi because ceremony and prayer are central to living Wolakota. We don’t compartmentalize our spiritual beliefs and keep them separate from the rest of who we are. This isn’t Sunday church service. Ceremony is life. We are to live our sacred ways every day the best we can.

We are a prayerful people, a soulful people. Spirituality is key to our identity as Oceti Sakowin, and the same can be said for many Natives who practice their traditional ways. We are spirits inhabiting bodies and there’s no defeating the spirit of a Native who is the living embodiment of his or her ancestors. This is something the Western Empire never fully understood, although they realized it was powerful. That’s why the government outlawed our sacred ceremonies for decades. We should all be thankful to those who kept them safe so we could pass them onto future generations.

Each of us is fighting a difficult battle- be it personal one, or for your family or community. Some fight addiction or trauma, others fight poverty, oppression, environmental destruction, or societal ignorance. Some of us are simply born to rage. Yet no matter your battle remember this: do as your ancestors did and consult the spirits. Let them help. Sitting Bull did. Purify yourself with sage and cedar. Pray. Sometimes that’s all you have, but it may be all you need. Arm yourself with the pipe, the canupa. This is the missing piece of our current puzzle, folks. Returning to the ways will bring healing and mend the sacred hoop.

READ THE REST HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/fighting-with-spirit-how-greasy-grass-was-won-by-ruth-hopkins/

24th Jun 2014

dxtx:

SINCE 1974, federal relocation policy has forced 14,000 Dine’ (Navajo) people from their ancestral homeland in Arizona. This genocidal policy was crafted by government agents and energy company representatives in order to gain access to the mineral resources of Black Mesa – billions of tons of coal, uranium and natural gas.

For over 30 years, traditional Dine’ at Black Mesa have lived in resistance, steadfastly refusing to relocate as strip-mines rip apart their sacred lands and generating plants poison the desert air.

(Text via:  Black Mesa Indigenous SupportVideo via: Rob Rosenfeld)

20th Jun 2014
BREAKDOWN:
Resolution Copper wants to build a mine in Chich’il Bidagoteel, a sacred site for the Apache people near Superior, AZ. The land now sits on National Forest land. A long-running battle over Native American land rights has the project in a holding pattern. And residents are looking to Congress to have the final say. Resolution and its parent companies have been trying for a decade to trade 5,556 acres they already own for 2,406 acres of the Tonto National Forest, which sit above the massive ore body.

The project owned by foreign mining giants U.K.-based Rio Tinto and Australia-based BHP Billiton — says the mine would create 1,400 jobs and generate $61 billion over its 40-year lifespan, plus construction and clean-up time. Block-cave is a mining process that excavates a large amount of rock and leaves a mountain-sized void underground, making subsidence and collapse inevitable. It would extract enough copper to meet 25 percent of U.S. demand of about 1 billion pounds of copper a year. It would also extract about 132,000 tons of rock daily from the ore body, which is 7,000 feet below ground. It’s projected to produce 1.7 billion tons of waste tailings.

Mine opponents argue that Resolution is pushing the land exchange to avoid key environmental studies that are mandated for mining on public land. The Sierra Club fears the mine “is going to destroy the water table and the biodiversity that exists.”

Voices from Community Members:
Vernelda Grant, archeologist for the San Carlos Apache Tribe, has said “There is a deeply personal, spiritual and visceral relationship between Apaches and the land” and her Apache ancestors fought miners for centuries and died trying to protect “Mother Earth.”

Wendsler Nosie, Former chairman of the San Carlos Apache tribe, wrote in a letter sent to a US Forestry Service official, that mining is inconsistent with conservative, traditional Apache values. “We have been taught to respect the natural world, and to keep it clean and natural. Our traditional relationship with the land is deep and personal. We depend on the natural world for our survival, and our survival depends on maintaining our personal relationships with all living things,” 

Nosie has also been quoted saying, “a return to the concept of “Mother Earth” for all Western peoples is ultimately the key to saving the planet.” He continued with,“We have to start deciding when enough is enough. I know Native people have a lot to offer if we are listened to. We know how to save this planet.”.

San Carlos point of contact: Vansler ‘Standing Fox’ at naaki.bball@gmail.com

 

8th May 2014

ANTI-COLONIAL STREET ART CONVERGENCE COMING SOON

4th May 2014
albuquerque

albuquerque

9th Apr 2014
BLUEMOONIYAN 24”x36” Framed Mixed Media on Masonite. $440 available at www.greyeyesart.storenvy.com or inquire at tomgreyeyesart@gmail.com

BLUEMOONIYAN 24”x36” Framed Mixed Media on Masonite. $440 available at www.greyeyesart.storenvy.com or inquire at tomgreyeyesart@gmail.com

13th Mar 2014

"Moving Forward" Art show at the University of Denver 

Tom GreyEyes and Ryan Singer 

Nahasdzáán PTSD”

"No Justice on Stolen Land" 

4’x4’ Mixed Media on Wooden Panel

Axhe’hee’ To Amanda and Julia for being amazing 

10th Mar 2014

Had a hand in this one, great design by Jaque.

indigenousnationhoodmovement:

decolonizingmedia:

Dope 30 ft. tall, mural version of the #ItEndsHere poster put up at the Paint PHX event in Phoenix, AZ last weekend on International Women’s Day. Amazing work!

jaquefragua x greyeyesart rocking it. 

RISE and DECOLONIZE, y’all.

This is awesome. Our Indigenous brothers standing strong and spreading the good word.

#ItEndsHere

2nd Mar 2014
Honored to be a part of this project.

Honored to be a part of this project.

12th Feb 2014

The Navajo Powerplant and Coal mine to the East of Navajo and our “leaders” that use our way of life as a means to sustain the cash flow. As Diné citizens we have a responsibility to honor the prayers & songs that have been made. We have to stop the contradiction to hòzhó and k’é. Our generation chooses sovereignty and rights to air, land, & water. It is not for sale & should not be corrupted. Through our collaboration with Honor the Treaties we are amplifying the voices of Navajo communities through art and advocacy. Honor the Treaties is a native art collective that dedicates their work to funding collaborations between Native artists and Native advocacy groups so that their messages can reach a wider audience.
Artists: Thomas Greyeyes & Kim Smith 
Location: The Billboard is located on U.S. Highway 64, directly across Hogback Trading Post in New Mexico – 10 miles east of Shiprock, NM.

Voices from Community Members:
“A reason for a billboard in this day and time is to tell a story, a story of how we got cheated of millions of dollars. This billboard tells the story of how BHP Billiton, a billion dollar company has taken advantage of us Diné people and our leaders allowed that to happen. No public hearings, no feedback on money spent on the mine purchase, our sovereignty was waived without our knowledge, completely no transparency in this action,” says Sarah Jane White, Burnham community member.
"Art acts as a political megaphone for the voiceless and transcends language barriers. It also plays a pivotal role in raising awareness and shaping people’s opinions. This project is very unique in its statement, mixed media approach, and the youth involvement," says Tom Greyeyes of Honor the Treaties.

6th Feb 2014
“nááts’íilid regression” 30”x40” acrylic 

nááts’íilid regression” 30”x40” acrylic 

6th Feb 2014
"comatose sundown" 13"x7.5" mixed media on rez scrap wood.

"comatose sundown" 13"x7.5" mixed media on rez scrap wood.

30th Jan 2014

Young Diné for Diné Liberation

http://youtu.be/ycAbRNSu4-M

"Our generation chooses true sovereignty, and the protection of our air, land, and water. These things are not for sale and should not be corrupted. 150 years ago, our ancestors were exiled from Diné Bikéyah on the Long Walk. We honor the suffering and hardship they endured by maintaining our relationship with Nihímá Nahasdzáán and Yádilhiił, revitalizing K’é and our Diné lifeways. Today, the irresponsible decisions of the Navajo Nation government regarding energy colonization and exploitation threaten our homeland and the future of our people. Our message, Bidziil Beehaz’áanii Dinébi, is a message to the Diné people to say that we are strong and our voices do matter, regardless of how the Navajo Nation government ignores and undermines us. We must take it upon ourselves in this critical time to speak up and act to ensure a future for Diné people within our four sacred mountains.”

‪#‎riseup‬ ‪#‎empowerthepeople‬

Window Rock, AZ

20th Jan 2014
nahasdzáán

nahasdzáán